No Tie Aspen – Simple Hack

I have this thing about taking patterns and tweaking them to create different looks. I can’t help it.  I justify it by saying I am getting more wear from one pattern. It works, right?

Recently, I had the opportunity to test the Aspen by Annelaine Patterns , in women and girls sizes. By the way, if you haven’t checked it out, it has just been re released in extended women’s sizing (00-30) and is currently on sale #enableralert

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Aspen in Brushed waffle from So Sew English Fabrics

For anyone that follows me on Instagram, you probably saw my gushing post about how everything lined up so perfectly. It was seriously such a pretty pattern and a real joy to sew up.

Of course, after making it I had to tweak it for another look. I made a few simple mods and presto, a no tie Aspen.

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No Tie Aspen in Brushed Waffle from So Sew English Fabrics

Since the original was so well designed it made these mods so much easier to make.

Here is what I did using my regular size 6 Aspen pattern.

First I took my front bodice piece, curved hem option. I used the side seam curve and continued the curve across to the center cut line. You can see the original pattern piece underneath and the new line (in red) that I made. I just free handed it and that will be your new front bodice piece.img_7885

Next you are going to want to match that curve on your front hem facing pattern piece.  To do that, I just laid my facing piece on top of the new front bodice piece we just made. The side seam matches perfectly. Then trace that exact same curve for the bottom of the facing piece. You can see the new line (in red) below.

Now we need to make the new top curve for our front facing piece. The top of the curve is about 1 ¼ “ from the bottom curve. Using my ruler, I measured 1 ¼ “  from the bottom curve, at the center cut line, and made a little dash. I worked all along the curve, making a bunch of dashes, until it connected with the original. (dashed lines pictured below).img_7886

I like to remeasure a few times at different places along the curve, to make sure I have an accurate line. Once I have that line, I blend it in with the original side seam curve to ensure a smooth pattern piece.

You now have your new front facing piece, in red (below). The dashed red lines indicate where your new interfacing piece will be cut to match your new front facing piece.

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You will cut two mirrored of your new front bodice piece, front facing piece, and interfacing piece, per the pattern directions.

I made no changes to the back bodice, back hem facing, or sleeve (besides adding length for my arms) pattern pieces. Make sure to cut those out too and assemble exactly like the pattern instructs.

When I attached the buttons and made the button holes, I placed one at the top V, one ½” up from the bottom hem, and evenly spaced the rest between.

That’s it. A few simple mods to add another look to your favorite Aspen

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No Tie Aspen in Brushed Waffle from So Sew English Fabrics

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash. All opinions on this blog are my own and I have a lot, ha ha ha.

About Me

Thanks for visiting my blog !!

I figured I should start with a little bit about myself.

I’m a stay at home Mom to two kiddos, a boy and a girl, that I homeschool. When I’m not homeschooling and sewing, my husband and I work on our fixer upper home and DIY projects around here. I have been married to my best friend for 14 years and he fully supports my sewing obsession.

I have been sewing for a few years now and am self taught. How did I start sewing?? Well, I’ve had a few starts and stops to be honest. The first was when we purchased our first home. I decided to sew up our window curtains, by hand, ha ha ha. They worked, they were cute, and that was it.

Fast forward a few years, like 8 years, and I decided to make cloth diapers for our soon to be born son. In my defense, it was one of those great ideas you get while pregnant. This time I asked my Grandma to teach me how to read a pattern and how to use her machine. My husband had a great idea to get me my own machine at this point, enter my Brother XR1355 Costco special. After we made a trip to the fabric store and got all our materials, we got started. My feet were so swollen I couldn’t push the pedal properly, it was either turtle or rabbit speed, no in between. Sitting? Yea, I had to decide between breathing or seeing the needle. Again, ha ha ha, and my Grandma ended up making the cloth diaper covers for me.

A few months after our son was born I now had my own sewing machine and it was just sitting there, so, I decided to make a dog bed. Not only did I make this dog bed, but I also added a zipper, my first, and it actually looked good!!! The dog promptly ate said bed, (moment of silence for stripe matching and full length invisible zipper) but it was glorious while it lasted, and pushed me to start exploring with my sewing.

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The zipper is hidden in the matching stripe on the right, so pretty!

I dabbled the following months/years with making random things, learning terms, and trying out paper patterns. I came across a pdf pattern company, Create Kids Couture (CKC)  in 2015, and used my first printed pattern. After that I started looking for more and found Patterns for Pirates (P4P). Which led me to Sincerely Rylee Fabrics ( 2015), Purpleseamstress Fabrics (2016) , and So Sew English Fabrics (SSE) (2016). Beginning the rabbit hole of sewing bliss.  Not to mention collecting gorgeous fabric! By the way, I say my fabric stash is a full wardrobe, some assembly required. Am I right?!?

From sewing dog beds to real pants I have loved every minute of this sewing journey so far and hope you enjoy coming along for the fun as I share my future adventures here.

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Dauphine Skinny Jeans – The DIBY Club

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash. All opinions on this blog are my own and I have a lot, ha ha ha.