To lounge or Not to lounge – not really a question

I have been wanting to sew something relaxed and comfy for a while. Something I could wear during the day that felt like pjs, but not my actual pjs. Something that I could put on in the mornings and pretend I was well rested and get my day off to a good start. So I started to formulate some ideas in my head and then went searching my friend, Pinterest. You all know I love to find pictures of what I’m thinking, and save them in my idea board to come back to later, if I forget what I had in mind. Fortunately for me, lounge sets are all the rage and it was a quick search to find what I envisioned.

Our current weather is still hovering around 100 during the day, but 60-70 in the mornings, and my body has been acting up so my temps are uncontrollable. Naturally that meant I needed two options 😂 a shorts set and a pants set. Then the fabric searching began. I fell in love with three tie dye prints from Fabmere Fabrics. I know!! Three tie dyes?? This from the girl that hasn’t really liked tie dye?? But these colors and the print pattern is not the normal swirl and I love them! With some difficulty I was able to slim it down to two, another reason for two lounge sets.

Since my daughter and I just started a little business together, I really wanted to save some money and use patterns I already owned. I went with the Women’s Lucy from Made for Mermaids and the Rebekah from Sonia Estep Designs for the short set.

I used this rib and it feels so luxurious and I can’t get over how pretty these colors are! It has the absolute perfect drape for the bishop sleeves. I made a few mods to the patterns to get the look I wanted, but they were relatively simple. For the shorts, I sized down one, since the pattern was designed for woven and I used a knit. Then for the curved hem, I used a narrow three thread stitch on my serger, and gently pulled the fabric while serging, to give it a slight lettuce hem.

On the Rebekah, I went with the boatneck, curved hem shirt length, sized up one for more slouch. The pattern already has bishop sleeves, but since I wanted it elastic instead of cuffed, I needed to make a modification to the sleeve. I wanted to keep the width at the wrist as the pattern was drafted, so I cut the sleeve in half and added 5.25″. The 5.25 is 1″ for my normal sleeve addition, 3″ for the cuff we are not using, and 1.25″ for the elastic casing. I used 1″ elastic and to pick my length, I measured my wrist and added 3″. I overlapped the elastic ends 1/2″ which made my finished wrist elastic 8″. I wanted it loose enough to pull up, but not loose enough to slip over my hands.

For the pants set, I used this brushed French Terry. It is really soft and cozy and will be perfect when I’m feeling chilled. For the pants I used the Greenstyle Creations Brassie Joggers. The mods I made for it were to omit the waist elastic and pockets, and change the ankle cuff to elastic. To omit the pockets, I just lined up the pocket piece with the front pants piece, and taped it together to make the front a full piece.

Then for the cuff to elastic change, I used the 32″ inseam length vs the cuff length, and rolled them up 1.25″ to make my elastic casing. I used 1″ elastic and for the length I did 12″. My ankle measures 8.5″ and I wanted to be able to pull them up to my calf, which is a bit larger so I added 3.5″ extra and did a 1/2″ overlap to secure.

The top for my pants set took me a little longer since I messed up and then my machine ended up eating it, so I had to fudge it a little. I really wanted a hooded V neck, but almost every v neck I came across had a band and it wasn’t the look I was going for, so I chose to use the Hannah from Sonia Estep Designs, sized up one. It has a hood option and a quarter zip, so I decided to use that as my base, and just omit the zipper.

The hood is lined, but I really wanted the brushed texture of the French Terry to be exposed so I omitted the hood lining as well. Which actually helped with the v neck and skipped zipper since I planned to serge up one side, around the hood, and back down to the other side. Then turn the serged edge under and topstitch. When I serged up and around, I cut off the triangle point, where the top of the zipper would have been, and made it more of a curved edge from the neckline to the hood.

This is where things got messy though 😂. The pattern has you cut down from the neckline and make a triangle, which allows for a perfect rectangle shape to insert your zipper. I wasn’t paying attention to the rectangle shape not being a V shape I wanted, until after I had already serged, turned, and topstitched, the entire hood and almost full neckline.

As I was about to finish the topstitching, I looked at it and went, oh *%*%*%*. So then I tried to fix it and my machine ate it and there was some more *%*%*%*. My husband suggested I take a break at that point, which I ignored (not stubborn), and I sat there for 30 minutes mulling over ideas. After all that, I couldn’t see any way around it, so I grabbed my pen and started drawing. I drew the V shape I wanted, blended into the neckline I already had. Then I topstitched my pen markings and into the current topstitch. Grabbed my scissors and cut out the extra fabric, just short of the sorta V shape stitching. Fortunately it is a relaxed look and knit doesn’t fray so it actually works, even if it’s not the prettiest stitching or V shape, I’ve ever done.

After I finished sewing these all up, I realized that both the Brassie Joggers and Mama Lucy have been updated since I purchased them, and now I want to make more pairs to try out the updated versions, although, I like the fit I have, so maybe I won’t mess with it, maybe.

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you.

Shorts, Shorts, and more Shorts

My daughter keeps growing and her wardrobe is in an almost constant rotation. Just when I think she has what she needs, she comes walking out of her room and I hear, “Mom, I grew again!”.

It’s usually when we are trying to run out the door or leaving on a trip, never the best times to sew. Fortunately, she likes the fit of the free Ginger Shorties from Sew Like My Mom. I can usually do a quick remeasure, reprint the few pages, cut and sew, and she has a new pair of shorts in under an hour. So the last time the scene played out, we went fabric shopping and I made her a few pairs, to hopefully buy some time.

This first pair was made from a Black Rainbow Foil Liverpool from So Sew English. She loves glitter and rainbow so these were a huge hit. I made her a coordinating Patterns for Pirates Jolly Roger Raglan in a purple French Terry I’ve had in my stash for a while.


This next pair was made from scraps from my recent Iris shorts ( you can see the sew along I did for them here). When she saw my shorts she fell in love with them and I was so happy I had enough scraps left to make her a pair of shorts, plus we got matching scrunchies, made by her. This fabric is a Scuba from So Sew English.

She picked a neon pink bullet from Sincerely Rylee for her third pair. She loves how it looks with her Sassy shirt and the bunny shirt she made for her birthday, back in April. She raided my stash for a coordinating fabric to make herself a headband too.


I am so glad that these are such quick sews!! You can see my time lapse of the scuba pair here.

Maybe these three pairs will last her through the rest of our warm weather, fingers crossed.

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. 

But first, photos!

Ever since I started sewing, I would take pictures of my makes and log the details in a notebook. It is fun to look back and see what you have made and how you have improved over the years. It’s also crazy helpful having details written out when they request the “exact same thing” a year later. Since this is my norm, my family knows, I will request photos of whatever I make for them, before they can have them. Cruel I know 😂.

I made the “mistake” of making my husband new shirts for him to wear under his work clothes, and he loved the fabric so much, he requested several others, in his favorite regular t-shirt pattern. For his work under shirts, I recreated his old store bought ones and saved a bunch of money. (You can see the full video tutorial here ). The work undershirts, are a much tighter fit, but for these new ones, he wanted a traditional, relaxed, t-shirt fit.

I pulled out our trusty t-shirt pattern, the Jalie 2918. Not only is this our most used mens t-shirt pattern, but it is also our most used t-shirt pattern for my son, yes, it has both mens and boys sizes included in one pattern! Naturally, my son wanted to have a few matching shirts with my husband, so they picked a few fabrics together. Not gonna lie, watching my guys fabric shopping together was amazing 💕

This is such a quick sew (you can see a time-lapse video of me sewing up one of these here), and with the large size range and pattern options, it really makes it cheaper than purchasing store bought.

First up was this University Red dry-fit from The Fabric Fairy. This is the same fabric base I used for my husband’s black undershirts. I purchased 2 yards and was able to get both a shirt for my husband and son. My guys love how smooth it feels and the moisture wicking properties are a major selling feature for them, especially since they are always outside doing something active and we live in the hot desert.


They also chose the Royal colorway of the same fabric. There is a slight difference in the feel between the red and blue, but nothing significant and they didn’t even notice it.


My husband wanted a few more tops and picked out two other fabrics from my So Sew English stash. First up was this Sage performance. It feels a little slicker/stiffer than the Nike dry-fit, but again, it’s so minimal, he didn’t notice it.

And the second stash pick, was this Silver Yoga performance, with added HTV. I’ve only done HTV a few times and this one was a learning experience for me. Plus all the weeding! But seeing him wash, wear, and repeat, was totally worth it.

Because of my “Photo First” rule, they were not able to wear most of them for a few weeks. It was such torture, but they finally gave me some pictures when we went camping a few weeks ago. Then proceeded to wear the shirts the entire time 😂


Since there are a couple other color ways of the Nike dry-fit in stock at the Fabric Fairy, they have requested a few more shirts. My daughter fell in love with the feel of the fabric too, so I used the pinkfire colorway for a new tank for her. Which you can read about here.

Spring Fling Blog Hop – Ogden Cami

Welcome to the Spring Fling Blog Hop! 

Spring Fling blog hop

First, here are all the blog hop details!! Each day there will be two bloggers, with new posts and giveaways! To enter for each giveaway, just visit each post (linked below) and add a comment to it. The blogs will be live each day by 6AM (Central Standard Time).  So be sure to come back daily and check out each one. If you are just joining the blog hop today, you can still go back to the previous days posts and comment there to enter for them as well. All entries need to be in by midnight, Friday, March 27. The drawings will take place on Saturday. Read all the way to the end for my giveaway details 💕

Monday Sew Much Charm & Vlogger Sewing From Scratch

Tuesday –  TPtheModestDoll22 & That’s Sew Venice

Wednesday –  SewGr8ful ( That’s me! ) & Sequoia Lynn Sews

Thursday –  Let’s Go Hobby! & The Sarcastic Sewist

Friday –  The Bear & the Pea Atelier & Wildflowers & Whimsey

Now, all about one of my favorite patterns for Spring and Summer. I found the True Bias Ogden Cami several years ago and fell in love with its simplicity. It is a semi loose fit shirt, made from woven fabrics. If you have been following my blog for any time, you know I love to modify and hack patterns to get additional looks with them. So after I made my first few Ogden cami’s, including a matching Mini Ogden for my daughter, I decided to turn it into a flowy maxi dress a few summers ago.

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This is a simple mod to make. All I did was carry the outer seamline down to my desired length, tapering it out a bit as I went down. Slightly curved the sides up so it hung even when worn, oh, and added pockets into the side seams. I absolutely love how cool I stay when wearing this maxi, a huge bonus for me with our desert heat. I used a navy polka dot rayon challis from So Sew English for this one.

As our weather has already started to heat up here, I have been thinking of my spring/summer wardrobe and knew I wanted to add another Ogden Cami. The problem I had was deciding which one. Since I couldn’t pick, I made three. One, per the pattern, another with a grommet hack, and the third in a knit fabric.

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This one was made with a beautiful modal spandex from Surge Fabrics. The only change I made to the pattern when using this knit fabric, was adding an interfacing to my straps.

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I didn’t want my shirt to grow and migrate down when wearing, so adding that interfacing holds it in place. With the knit having more drape than a woven, and depending on the fabric you choose, I’d definitely recommend adding the interfacing to the straps and also basting your straps in to verify the shirt hits you where you are comfortable. I used Pellon EK130 for the straps.

I also want to note that I wear a bra with all my Ogdens. You can occasionally see my nude shoulder strap, but it isn’t something that bothers me, and if you wanted to widen the straps a little, you totally could.

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My second Ogden was done exactly per the pattern instructions. I used a rayon challis from Surge Fabrics. I love how smooth and cool rayon challis feels. It has such great drape that it works well for dresses and tops, especially those you want movement with.

This shirt looks great half tucked in or fully loose and I feel very springy.

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I fell in love with a shirt on Pinterest, that had a very similar look to the Ogden, just with tie straps being fed through grommets. I decided to use another rayon challis I had, this one from Sincerely Rylee fabrics. An added bonus to the tie straps, is making the shirt easy to adjust if you needed to, possibly even breastfeeding friendly.

I had to make a few more modifications to the pattern to make this look happen, but they are still relatively simple. Here are the steps I took to get this look.

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I used Dritz eyelets, size 7/16″. Since the top of the bodice, where the straps attach, isn’t wide enough to accommodate this size grommet, it needed to be widened. I centered my grommet on the back pattern piece and then added an additional 3/8″ to each side.

I carried that extra width down until just past the bottom of the grommet. Then I tapered that into the original neckline and armscye. I smoothed out the lines and made sure to repeat the same steps on the lining pieces as well as the front piece.

I skipped cutting out the straps until the end, at which point I determined I wanted them to be three times the length of the original strap. Mine ended up being 28.5″ long. To make the straps, I folded them wrong side together lengthwise, and sewed around the three open sides. I left a few inch gap in the middle of the longest side, for turning. Then I clipped the corners and turned right side out. Tucking in the edges and topstitching over the opening to close it.

To sew up the shirt, I did step one, and then added a 1.5″ square of interfacing to the wrong side of the front bodice pieces. I wanted to leave a little room in addition to the seam allowance, so I placed it 3/4″ down from the top edge. I used Pellon 911FF.

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You will then skip to step 4 and 5. When you get to step 6 & 7 you will sew the full neckline and armholes of the lining to the main fabric, right sides together. This will make your two pieces, one full piece. Snip your V in the front and back and clip all around following step 8.

You will then skip step 9 and 10, and do the edge stitching of step 11. Complete step 12, hem, and press. Then add the grommets. I set the grommet on the shirt, centered on that square interfacing we added earlier. Followed the grommet package instructions to attach, and it was done.

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I was surprised at how quick it was to sew this grommet version and I am so glad I attempted it.

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I hope you enjoyed all my recent Ogden Cami’s and modifications.

True Bias has graciously given a copy of the Ogden Cami as a prize, for one of my readers. To enter just drop me a comment below, letting me know which one was your favorite?

Thank you for joining us on this Spring Fling Blog Hop and don’t forget to visit the other blogs !!!

Happy Sewing 💕

Monday Sew Much Charm & Vlogger Sewing From Scratch

Tuesday –  TPtheModestDoll22 & That’s Sew Venice

Wednesday –  SewGr8ful ( That’s me! ) & Sequoia Lynn Sews

Thursday –  Let’s Go Hobby! & The Sarcastic Sewist

Friday –  The Bear & the Pea Atelier & Wildflowers & Whimsey

Anyone seen my Sewjo? – Knoxville Tanks

In the sewing community, Sewjo is commonly referred to as the desire to sew, or being inspired to sew and create. So how does one loose their sewjo? I have never lost mine until recently and it was due to a personal loss which threw me for a physical and emotional loop.

Once I started feeling better physically I assumed I would just get back to sewing. Sewing has always been my outlet when I’m stressed or dealing with health issues. But not this time. I had absolutely no desire to even step into my sewing room. It was so bad I even told my husband I wanted to get rid of all my fabric and machines, and just walk away. Drastic, I know, but that was where I was.

Knowing how much I love sewing and how it has been such a life saver for me throughout the years, he wisely told me to take a break and just breathe. So I shut everything off and took a weekend away to focus on our two children and our little family. We spent the time working on DIY projects around our house. I painted my daughters antique headboard and chair, to match the rest of her bedroom set. We painted our master bathroom and cleaned up the renovation mess. Then we started building the drawers we are putting into our closet. It felt good to get “something” done, it was a creative outlet, we got fresh air, and had lots of laughs while we challenged each other to Mario Kart.

Did I magically find my sewjo? Nope. But I felt refreshed mentally and true priorities were once again apparent. Priority number one, spending one on one time with my daughter. So when I asked her if she would like to have a girls date with me, she gave an overwhelming YES!! and promptly asked if I could make us matching shirts for our date. SIGH. Remember me, no sewjo to be found??

I couldn’t tell her no though. Her excitement was obvious and after the sadness it was apparent she needed that time, just as much as I did.

We spent some time going through patterns and all the fabric in my sewing room. After a week of dragging my feet, we finally had things figured out.

We decided on the tank version of the Knoxville from New Horizons Designs, in grey rayon spandex, and some fun vinyl writing. The Knoxville has the twist knot or bottom knot, shirt or tunic lengths, five sleeve options, and three neckline options including a cowl. We chose to do the twist knot, shirt length, and the scoop neck options for our tanks.

It was the first time I have made this pattern and it was hard to muddle through. Not because of the pattern or directions, but because I desperately didn’t want to sew. I did it though, and the end product was smile worthy. If you want to see a time lapse of me sewing them up, you can on my YouTube here.

Something I wanted to mention was that I graded to a larger hip, per my measurements, but I probably could have done a straight size as the shirt has a nice amount of ease in the waist and hip. Fabric choice will also affect the amount of ease and drape of this shirt.

One other thing I noticed was on my front bodice, the side with the knot, was considerably longer than my back bodice on that side. After a quick search in the Facebook group I found that certain fabrics can get stretched out at that part due to it being cut on the crossgrain. The solution was to ease that extra amount in when sewing the bodice together. I did that on mine and it worked well. So keep that in mind when you go to make your own version.

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Now we are all ready for our girls date this weekend in our matching Knoxville tanks and I found a little of my sewjo.

Here’s to taking those little steps and finding the joy in sewing again. 💕

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P.S. Yes, I chopped 14″ off my hair 😂

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. 

Tank Hack for a Pinspiration Jumpsuit

Yup, Pinterest strikes again.  This time I was testing a new pattern from Sonia Estep Designs, the Hollywood. When I made my muslin fit, I tried it on before adding the sleeves and I knew right then I needed it to be a tank. Naturally, I scrolled Pinterest to get some color ideas and came across this fun version.

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Yes! This was happening. I went fabric shopping and found steel cupro slub and black cupro pique from Surge fabrics. I have really liked cupro the last two times I used it. It has a little stretch vertical, and about 50% horizontal. I love that it doesn’t have a ton of vertical stretch, which helps longer garments like these pants or a skirt, keep its shape. It is just annoying to make something and then it grows inches after putting it on. No issues with that using this cupro, and it has nice drape.

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Now, I took my hack a little further than just making it a tank, by color blocking my neckband and arm band pieces to match the bodice colors. I also added in the solid black stripe on the legs. Doing the extra color matching added some more math, but over all, converting it to a tank is relatively simple.

Since I liked where the fit was on my non sleeve muslin, I knew I just needed to do a small adjustment to the armscye and make bands. I wanted to have a finished armband of 1/2″ to keep it close to the look of the current neckband. With the seam allowance of 1/4″ for the bodice piece, I marked and removed 1/4″ from the armscyce, which made my finished tank hit the same place as the sleeveless muslin. Be sure to make this adjustment on both the front and back bodice pieces.

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I love to keep my pattern pieces together as much as I can, so I usually tape in the center of my cut, and make a kind of hinge. Then I can fold back the piece I need to remove to make a tank or leave it down for a sleeved version.

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To figure out my bands, I measured the new armscyce and multiplied it by 90%. I like to use 90% for cupro since it has less stretch and I didn’t want my armbands tight, just a comfortable fit. My bands ended up being 17 3/8″ x 1 1/2″ for reference. To make a simple tank version, that is all you need to do. You would follow the pattern tutorial for assembly, with the exception of skipping steps 6 & 7, do step 8, and then attach your armbands.

Now for the “extra” stuff 😂 I really wanted my armbands and neckband to match the bodice colors exactly. To do that, I needed to make my neckband two pieces, and one of my armbands, two pieces as well.

For my neckband I needed gray for one front bodice piece and the back bodice piece, then black for the other front bodice piece. So I measured those two pieces separately, multiplied them each by 85% (yes, 85%. I was worried it wouldn’t hold me in if I did longer, but in retrospect, 90% would have worked as well with this cupro) and cut the two out, using the same width as the original neckband piece. I then sewed them right sides together to make my complete neckband.

For the one armband that had a black front and a grey back, I simply measured the front bodice armscye and multiplied that by 90% for the black portion, and measured the back bodice armscye, multiplied by 90%, to get the grey portion. Sewed the two pieces right sides together, and had the matching armband.

When sewing, you will just match up those seams with the coordinating bodice seams and attach. The tricky part for me was the neckband. Since the shoulder seam is not the quarter point, I had to be extra careful with how much I was stretching and make sure the color block seams met. Of course it was my armband that ended up a little off, but for the most part, it looks like one seam.

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I should note, I did all my color blocking and measuring, AFTER I had already graded the pattern and added length for my side waist, rise, and legs. 

The last modification I made to the pattern was adding in the black stripe to the legs. After looking at my pattern piece and the pinspiration photo, I decided I wanted to make the stripe around 3″ wide. I didn’t feel like making two separate pattern pieces for the color block, so I took my front pant piece and measured in from the outer seam, 2.75″.

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I measured and marked the entire length of the pants piece and then connected the marks to make a smooth line. I used the same “hinge” technique for this and cut up and down the line, leaving my secured piece in the middle.

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It is very important that you account for whatever seam allowance you want to use for sewing these two pieces together, or your pants will be too small.

I like to use 1/4″ so when I cut out my grey piece, I cut 1/4″ out from the pattern edge. Then I flipped the main portion back and cut out my black stripe, again adding 1/4″ to the color blocked edge. I figured out that my rotary edge is about 1/4″ away from the blade, so I just line that up with the fabric and it cuts and adds the 1/4″ all in one step.

Once you have your stripes and front pant pieces cut out, you will just sew them right sides together, to create your full pattern pieces, and assemble per the pattern tutorial.

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I am ridiculously pleased with this final jumpsuit and know I will be making other versions of Hollywood with the tank modification. What do you think? Pinterest Nail or Fail?

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Enabler alert. The Hollywood is from Sonia Estep Designs and on sale for 50% off until January 26th, 11:59pm EST. The pattern options include a crossover bodice with three sleeve lengths, a shorts romper (in three lengths), a pants jumpsuit, and a skirted shorts romper. Plus you can do a simple mod and make your own tank version 😉

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash.

 

Adventures in sewing- My first stuffies

Lets start this by saying the sewing of these stuffies was done in secret, late nights, and while kids were distracted. I apologize in advance for the picture clutter and lighting. I had to keep a stack of patterns and fabric within reach to quickly cover my sewing when they popped in to ask the 11 millionth random question of the day 😂 Also, Stuffies = Stuffed Animals, that was the first thing I learned.

Why am I making stuffies?? Well, let me tell you a little story. A few months back Ikea did their annual Soft Toy Drawing Contest. We heard about it and naturally our two kids wanted to enter. They immediately set to work on creating a drawing of their dream stuffed animal. This is what they created, Venessa and Rex.

We submitted their pictures and then realized this contest was voting based. We don’t know tons of people to go vote daily, and it quickly became apparent that they weren’t going to win, when several drawings were getting hundreds of votes a day. The kids still enjoyed watching us vote daily, checking their numbers, and looking at the other entries. We talked about it as a family and yes, turned it into a teaching moment. They were disappointed but good sports about it.

Then I started thinking. What if I could find a pattern similar and try to recreate them for them?? So I started searching. I posted in several FB groups I frequent, asking for pattern suggestions that might match their animals. Of the suggestions, two were very close so I decided to give them a try.

I went through my fabric stash to see if I even had the right colors to make these. Shockingly, I did.

Rex was up first.

For Rex, I used the Timmy T-Rex pattern from Funky Friends Factory. I’ve been sewing for a while now, so I figured this pattern wouldn’t be much different to follow. Yea… I got stuck on step 2 (the spike) 😂. I set it aside and proceeded with the rest of assembly. Once I was at the point of attaching the body pieces, and the spike needed to be on, I chatted with several of my sewing friends. We agreed on a course of sewing and I continued with lots of fingers crossed and “you got this” gifs.

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It worked, the spike was on, and the rest of assembly continued. Until I got to the eye.

I really wanted it to look like my sons drawing so I thought I’d try stitching it. When I realized I used a non fabric pen to draw my tracing lines, I had a moment of panic. It didn’t match exactly and you could see both the pen marks and the wobbly stitching, and it didn’t look like his drawing. I decided to grab a permanent fabric marker and drew over it all. YUCK, I was less than thrilled with the look.

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Since Rex was all done and ready to stuff at this point, I decided to set him aside and start assembly on Venessa, while I mulled over the eye issue.

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For Venessa I used the free Octopus pattern from Halla Patterns. You can find it, and the photo tutorial, in their FB group files and photo album.

After sewing Rex, I felt a bit more comfortable with stuffy number two, and it went pretty quickly.

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I got really excited when I laid out the legs like this and saw a glimpse of what the final product would be. The pattern suggests taking a picture at this point so you can remember where you want the legs when it comes time to attach. Then it was time to sew the legs/arms/tentacles, whatever you want to call them.

In my haste I forgot to turn my tension back up from zero, and didn’t catch it until after leg number four. So I seam ripped and then redid.

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They were finally done and ready to stuff.

Side bar to talk about how insane poly-fil is! This was my first experience with it and I ordered a box online when Joann had a crazy sale a few weeks back. I took one snip of the plastic bag and POOF! It was like a roll of biscuits. It caught me so off guard I let out a little yelp, which of course, drew my children’s attention. Oops.

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Got the kids distracted again, and went back to Venessa. As I was stuffing the legs, I didn’t like how the purple fabric was feeling. It was stretching weird and showing stitches, and felt rough. I went back through my fabric and found a different purple I had missed the first time and switched it out.

Remember that picture of the legs laid out from earlier? It was so helpful at this point.

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The pattern recommends pinning or basting the legs on at this point, but I wasn’t completely sure, on how they were supposed to be spaced, so I opted for using wonder tape and clips.

Note: I don’t like the bulk stuff I got off amazon, it doesn’t seem to stick as well as my past Dritz brand. One leg fell halfway off and two others fell partway off when I was actually sewing the body together, which meant I had some extra hand sewing to fix it all.

Once that was all done, I was back to the eyes. My daughter’s drawing, had a blue circle and then a black center. I used a quarter, traced out two circles in some matching fabric and an iron on adhesive. I ironed on the blue, then with a matching thread I stitched the edges to make sure they were secured. Then I was back to the black again. I chatted with my sewing friends, showed them Rex’s eyes, and went over the things I tried and didn’t like. They suggested I try some HTV (heat transfer vinyl). After a phone call for software help and two hours of playing with sizing, I managed to print and iron on some eyes, brow, and smile. My friends are amazing, just FYI 💕

All that was left at this point was to stuff Venessa’s body, stuff Rex, and hand stitch up the remaining openings. I had never stuffed anything before so I just kind of started and then quickly realized it was lumpy and not filling the edges too well. So I removed it and started again. This time I separated out smaller pieces and worked them into the points with my finger. I also fluffed the pieces together inside, as I was adding more and it worked much better. I have no idea if the spike on Rex was supposed to be stuffed or not, but I really wanted to have it stuffed, so I kind of winged the actual sewing it on part, and made sure to leave an opening for stuffing.

Overall it went pretty well!

I give you Venessa

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and Rex

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My kids thought I was wrapping Christmas presents when I booted them outside to take these pictures 😂😂 They were quite stumped when the amount under the tree didn’t change.

Most of the fabric for these was from my So Sew English DBP stash. They are incredibly soft and squishy, I know, I gave them a few hugs myself 💕

I can not wait for them to open these on Christmas. My husband is going to try and video them so maybe I will have to update this with their responses later.

Ohhh and yea, that big ole box of poly-fil?? I barely made a dent in it. This is probably why…

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OOPS 😆

Hannah Hem Hack-Skip The $68 Price Tag

This really isn’t a hack, more of a simple mod, but I couldn’t resist the title of Hannah Hem Hack. It was just too much fun.

I’ve made a Hannah in quilted, a quilted and brushed French Terry combo, and a poly skimo hacci. You can see them here.  So when I decided to recreate this pin ($68 price tag, no thank you), I pulled out my left over plaid super plush from last year.

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I really wanted to have the black contrast collar, so I cut into my hoarded black super plush, for the collar lining and it was just right.

The Hannah pattern is banded at the bottom and the sleeves are cuffed, so to recreate this pin, I needed to alter it just a little for a hem.

To start with I added the amount of the bottom band, to the hem of the bodice, plus a bit more for my 1″ hem. I usually like a 1/2″ hem, but for super plush I prefer a larger hem since it is so squishy. I made my marks off the bottom of the original bodice pieces, and drew a line to indicate my new bottom hem.

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Then I needed to draw my new side seams. Since it has a slight widening at the hem and I didn’t want to continue that line and make a flare, I brought it in a little and blended into the original side seams.

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When all was said and done, I ended up taking an inch back off the hem after I tried it on, which gave me a total addition of 3.5″. I did this to both the front and back bodice pieces.

I followed the same steps for the sleeves and added 4.25″ to them. The only difference to the sleeves was that they taper in at the hem. Since I didn’t want them too tight, I wrapped a scrap piece of fabric around my wrist to determine how snug of a fit I wanted. Then I added a little to the fabric length to account for seam allowance, and that was what I made the width of the sleeve at the hem. Then I blended the lines in to the original sleeve seams for my new pieces.

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I made no other changes to the pattern and with those two simple mods, I now have a hem option Hannah.

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The Hannah is on new release sale for $5 until Sunday 11/3, midnight EST. The fabric is super plush from So Sew English. With a total price tag of $30, it is a bit more up my alley, and it’s custom fit to top it off.B632F6C1-E61D-47F3-9C7B-DDC56AAAD428

This post may contain affiliate links. This means if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash. All opinions on this blog are my own.

Three years waiting and just in time

Several years ago I found a pullover I fell in love with. After seeing it, I found a few pictures of similar ones on Pinterest and saved them to my inspiration board so I wouldn’t forget details about them. I spent time shopping for fabric and trying to find the pattern. After finally giving up the pattern search last year, I found a mens pattern that I figured I could hack to make my pullover.

The cold season quickly changes here and I never got a chance to attempt my hacking. So when Sonia decided to make the Hannah pattern, I literally jumped up and down with joy. Now, I get to start making all the Hannah’s, with all the fabric, I have been accumulating for the past three years. And not a moment too soon, with the weather just starting to change, I will have plenty of time to wear them all.

Hannah has cuffed sleeves, a banded hem, a quarter zip, and the options of a hood or collar. Both the hood and collar are lined and you even have the option to finish them with bias binding around the neckline. There is also an optional kangaroo pocket.

My first Hannah is in a grey quilted fabric from So Sew English. I had planned to use a contrasting bias in a dark blue color, to match my zipper tape. Unfortunately, when I went to the store, I grabbed the wrong one. I ended up finishing the collar with the other pattern option and I still love how it turned out.

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I did the collar and kangaroo pocket options for this grey quilted, and used an 11″ zipper.  I am ridiculously proud of this kangaroo pocket. Can we take a moment to enjoy how it lines up??

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My next Hannah is also made from quilted, but this time it is the ivory, and I only used it on the bodice, hem band, and the outer hood. For the rest of the hoodie, I used a super soft brushed French Terry. Both fabrics are from So Sew English Fabrics.

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On this one, I skipped the kangaroo pocket, and did the hood option.

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When I did the zipper on this one, I really wanted to try a 10″ length, but I only had 9″ and 11″ zippers. So I used an 11″ zipper, and did the assembly as though it was a 10″ zipper. When I got to the step of trimming the hood stand, I just cut off my extra zipper length. My stop got cut off, but it didn’t affect my zipper at all, as it was sewn into the hood corner.

This third one is so comfy! I got this poly skimo hacci last year from Sincerely Rylee fabrics. It is a slightly open weave, yet warm, and I just love this wine color with the little black flecks.

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For this one, I also did the hood option with no kangaroo pocket, but I used the bias binding option, to finish off the hood neckline. It looks so pretty!

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I love the length on the Hannah. I added my usual length for my height, and it hits just right. I can easily wear it with leggings or a pair of jeans, if I want.

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I have a few more Hannah’s planned, including a simple mod to make it without cuffs and a band. That mod will be up on here shortly, so be sure to come back and check it out.

Enabler alert: The Hannah from Sonia Estep Designs, is on sale for 50% off during it’s release sale, ending Sunday 11/3, at midnight.

This post may contain affiliate links. This means, if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash. All opinions on this blog are my own.

And now, her list

If you read my last post, it was about my son’s clothing list he “needed”. My daughter’s list was a little more conservative in its length, but now that I have completed it, she seems to need additional things. I kind of feel like she is playing me. Oh, just make a few things Mom. Oh, would you look at that, guess I need this now and ohh what about that?? Hey Mom, what is that fabric for? Oh do you think you could make me something in it too?? Oh Mom, that is so soft, it’s like your hugs… Okay, I made that last one up. You get the point though. She loves my makes and that is such an awesome feeling.

My kids love the fabric options from So Sew English almost as much as I do, so when she was making her list, she asked if she could shop for fabric on their site. She made her list, complete with fabric choices, and this is what she picked.

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First up is this super fun Lilac Unicorn print Double Brushed Poly. Not only does it have unicorns all over, but it also has the foil stars. I tried so hard to get good pictures of the stars, and just couldn’t quite get it. She wanted a shirt to wear with leggings and jeans, but requested something a little different than what we had done before. I showed her the patterns I had already but hadn’t made for her yet, and she picked the Spice Cake Dolman from Pattern for Pirates.

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The Spice Cake is the girls version of their Pumpkin Spice Dolman for women, which just so happened to be one of the first tops I made myself. The pattern can be made with a short sleeve, 3/4 sleeve, or a long sleeve. You can choose a straight shirt length, curved tunic length, or a banded option with short or tall bands. For her unicorn shirt, she picked the long sleeve, curved hem tunic length.

For fun I did a quick time lapse video, sewing up this Spice Cake Dolman.

After my last time lapse, I had a few questions regarding the clipping I did to my seams when hemming. You can see it at about 1:32 in this current time lapse. Since I took my coverstitch out of time out and have been giving it another chance, I have found that I get less skipped stitches, if I clip into my seam allowance, and split my hems opposite directions. I do not clip all the way through, just up to the left needle thread. This also helps when I am hemming sleeves or pants, as it allows me fold at exactly the right amount. One other note about this time lapse. I usually iron my curved hems while I am folding them. I just did a finger press on this one, since my iron was out of commission. Ironing before stitching is definitely something I don’t like to skip, especially when doing curved hems.

To finish off her “first” list, she asked for two new pairs of leggings. She wanted something really colorful with lots of pattern, that she could wear with solid tops. She picked the Navy “knit print” double brushed poly for this pair.

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And for the second pair she picked this pretty Lilac scales print double brushed poly. The lilac dbp is only available in a bundle now, but there are some colorways of the French Terry scales, in yardage.

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For both pairs of leggings we used the Bonny leggings from Made for Mermaids. This is a pattern we have been using for her for a while, and she just loves how they fit. The pattern is free, has several length options, and also comes with a skirt, which she loves as well.

I should have known her list was going to grow, once I found the piles of clothing they hid when making their need lists. Guess I should start working on those “extras” soon. Although, I do have a few things on my “need” list, so maybe they will be next. 😂

This post may contain affiliate links. This means, if you make a purchase through that link, I may get a % back, at no additional cost to you. Let’s be honest, we all know it goes right back to adding to my fabric stash. All opinions on this blog are my own.